CannabisLink.ca






HOME GOVERNMENT
LEGAL LINKS
MEDICAL NEWS




Go to year:
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Current Affairs - Bill C-10 (20 items)

Oct 12 Mandatory Minimums for Cannabis begin on November 6 REMINDER: Penalties of 6 months or more for growing 6 plants will start next month. Harper is right, we won't recognize Canada when he is through with it.
Mar 12 Bill C 10 passed by Conservatives The Conservatives have used their majority to pass the so-called omnibus crime bill within the first 100 sitting days of Parliament as promised, despite continued opposition from Canada's largest provinces which vowed Monday not to sit back idly as the measures come into force. C-10 Document
Feb 28 Crime Bill to Return to House of Commons With a Few Changes The federal government's omnibus crime bill will be heading back to the House of Commons after senators approved changes to Bill C-10 early Monday. The changes, proposed by Ontario Conservative Senator Bob Runciman, were approved easily, but changes Liberal senators wanted to the Safe Streets and Communities Act received a tougher ride, including a failed proposal to raise the number of marijuana plants one could legally grow to 20 from six
Bill C- 15: Bill to Amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act See Mandatory Minimum Sentences

New section 5(3)(a.1) of the CDSA reenacts the current section 5(4) of the CDSA and imposes a maximum punishment of imprisonment for five years less a day if the trafficking offence is for a small amount of cannabis or its derivatives, as listed in Schedule II.

Clause 1 amends the CDSA to impose a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of two years if certain other aggravating factors apply, including that the offence was committed in or near a school, on or near school grounds, or in or near any other public place usually frequented by persons under the age of 18 years. Defining such places may prove to be difficult.

Clause 2 of Bill C-15 imposes a mandatory minimum punishment of imprisonment for one year if the offence is committed for the purpose of trafficking and the substance involved is included in Schedule I and is in an amount that does not exceed one kilogram, or is listed in Schedule II. As in clauses 1 and 3, the maximum punishment of imprisonment for life is retained.

Mandatory minimum punishments will also be introduced for the production of cannabis (marihuana), with their length depending upon the number of marihuana plants produced.- The term of imprisonment will be at least six months if the number of plants produced is fewer than 201 and the production is for the purpose of trafficking.- The minimum penalty increases to nine months in these circumstances if any of the health and safety factors apply


LINKS

See:Video of Senate Hearings testimony
See:Transcripts from the Hearings

TIMELINE

December 30, 2009: Prime Minister Shuts Down Parliament until March, 2010 - Kills Bill C-15
December 9, 2009: The Senate has voted to amend Bill C-15. The bill will now go to Third Reading in the Senate, and then will be forwarded back to the House of Commons.
December 3, 2009: Canadian Senate Committee Passes Bill C-15 with minor amendments. Now goes to Senate as a whole for a vote, then signed by the Governor General to become law. See: What does C-15 mean after the Senate amendments?
September 17, 2009: Bill C-15: 2nd Reading - On motion of Senator Wallace, bill referred to Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, on division.
June 25, 2009:It was moved by the Honourable Senator Tardif, seconded by the Honourable Senator Fraser, that debate be adjourned to the next sitting of the Senate.
June 22, 2009: Bill C-15 goes to the Senate for second reading

June 10, 2009: Bill C-15 goes to the Senate for first reading
The Hon. the Speaker informed the Senate that a message had been received from the House of Commons with Bill C-15, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts.
June 8, 2009: Bill C-15, mandatory minimum sentences for drug offences including marijuana passed the House of Commons 195/54.

Bill C-15 Newsfeed


Nov 24 National Day of Action - Stop Crime Bill Canadians are standing together against a fill-the-prisons approach to justice that has failed everywhere its been tried.

Join a coalition of groups for two days of action to speak out against the cruel Crime Bill. Time is running out to make Canada safer, not meaner - we need you to help us all make a big impact.

Where: Our MPs local constituency offices.

When: Focus on Thursday at 1pm, with actions throughout Thursday and Friday.

Were going to tell our MPs: Dont mess up like Texas. Stop the cruel Crime Bill.

Bring friends, and bring a cowboy hat if you can. We will deliver tens of thousand of petition signatures and a summary of the Canadian Bar Associations powerful argument against the bill.

Our goal is to show cross-country solidarity by reaching as many MPs offices as possible, you and a friend are all we need to send a powerful message.
Oct 31 Sign the Petition -Stop Bill C-10: Make Canada Safer, Not Meaner OVER 70,600 SIGNERS!!

PLUS ANOTHER PETITION WITH 22,000 SIGNERS!

Our Conservative government is trying to rush through a cruel Crime Bill with mandatory sentences that will fill new prisons. Even conservative Texans think the Crime Bill is too harsh, costly and ineffective. Send a message to Justice Minister Rob Nicholson to stop the Crime Bill from making Canada meaner and more dangerous.
Oct 6 Bill S-10 Hurts People, Families And Public Coffers For immediate release

Over 200 experts call on Senators to be sensible on crime

Toronto, 6 October 2010 - Over 200 frontline organizations, public health professionals, researchers and experts - working with people who use drugs and those vulnerable to HIV infection - have endorsed a letter calling on the federal government to get sensible, rather than tough on crime.

This action comes as the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs deliberates this week on whether to hold hearings on Bill S-10 (an Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts). The letter - endorsed by the Committeeís own former co- chair, Senator Pierre Claude Nolin - urges Committee members to respond to the public health problem of drug addiction by focusing on scientifically proven approaches instead of demonstrably ineffective ones, such as mandatory minimum sentences. If the Committee chooses not to hold hearings, crucial expert testimony may never be heard. [READ MORE]
May 5 C-15 Has Returned - Now Called S-10 Rob Nicholson today reintroduced C-15 as Bill S-10, the bill is slightly different, with mandatory minimum sentences kicking in at 6 plants, not 1. So, to say again, the bill no longer has a mandatory minimum sentence for 1 marijuana plant.
Dec 30 Prime Minister Shuts Down Parliament - Kills Bill C-15 In a political maneuver designed to shield his embattled Conservative government from criticism during the upcoming Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canadian Prime Minister Steven Harper on December 30th "prorogued," or shut down, Parliament until a new session begins in March. The move kills all pending legislation, including a Tory "tough on crime" bill, C-15, that included mandatory minimum nine-month prison sentences for growing as much as a single marijuana plant.
Dec 9 Senate Accepts Bill C-15 Amendments The Senate has voted to amend Bill C-15. The bill will now go to Third Reading in the Senate, and then will be forwarded back to the House of Commons.
Dec 3 Canadian Senate Committee Passes Bill C-15 C-15 has been passed by the Senate Committee with minor amendments.

It now proceeds to the Senate for a final vote. After that, the bill only requires a signature by the Governor General to become law.

See: What does C-15 mean after the Senate amendments?
Oct 21 C-15 Senate Committee Transcript: Wed, Oct. 21, 2009 THE STANDING SENATE COMMITTEE ON LEGAL AND

CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS

EVIDENCE

OTTAWA, Wednesday, October 21, 2009

The Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, to which was referred Bill C-15, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts, met this day at 5 p.m. to give consideration to the bill.

Senator Pierre Claude Nolin (Deputy Chair) in the chair.

The Deputy Chair: Welcome, everyone. We will have two things to start with today. First, I have a declaration to report to you. Colleagues, I would like to indicate that Senator Campbell has made a written declaration of private interest regarding Bill S-226. In accordance with rule 32.1, the declaration shall be recorded in the minutes of proceedings of this committee.
Oct 6 Senate C-15 Hearings start Thusday @ 10:45 am Eastern Legal and Constitutional Affairs
Thursday, October 8, 2009 10:45 am
Location: Room 257, East Block
(Televised live on PTN)
(Webcast)
Clerk: Jessica Richardson (613-990-6087)
Agenda for the meeting - Senate


Bill C-15, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts.
Sep 17 Bill C-15 Referred to Senate Committee Referred to Committee

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, when shall this bill be read the third time?

(On motion of Senator Wallace, bill referred to Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, on division.)
Jun 25 Senate stalls passage of mandatory minimum sentencing legislation "Conservative Justice Minister Rob Nicholson held a press conference today to protest the slow pace of the passage his so-called 'law and order' agenda in the Senate. Nicholson specifically cited Bill C-15, which proposes mandatory jail terms for growing even a few marijuana plants, and implored the Senate to pass the bill in less than 24 hours."
Jun 10 Bill C-15 has first reading in Senate Controlled Drugs and Substances Act -> Bill to Amend - First Reading
The Hon. the Speaker informed the Senate that a message had been received from the House of Commons with Bill C-15, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts.
Second reading: June 12, 2009.

Email all the Senators about Bill C-15

Controlled Drugs and Substances Act -> Bill to Amend - First Reading
The Hon. the Speaker informed the Senate that a message had been received from the House of Commons with Bill C-15, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts.
Second reading: June 12, 2009. See Mandatory Minimum Sentences
Jun 8 Bill C-15 passes - with a minority government! Bill C-15, mandatory minimum sentences for drug offences including marijuana passed the House of Commons 195/54. The bill was pushed through by the Conservative Party with the support of the Liberals. EMAIL THE LIBERALS AND TELL THEM HOW YOU FEEL The Senate must still study and pass C-15, and is the last chance to stop this Bill from becoming law. This is a rare event, but does happen, as it did in 1991 with the abortion law.
Jun 5 C-15 vote delayed until Monday, June 8 Due to some unusual Parliamentary tactics, the vote on C-15 was postponed until Monday. If it is postponed 5 more days, the session will end and C-15 may die. There is still time to do something
Apr 27 Bill C-15 Committee Meetings
Mar 26 Bill C-15 could fill Canadian prisons with drug offenders If passed into law, Bill C-15 would, among its other provisions, throw people caught with one marijuana plant into the slammer for a minimum of six months. If growing a single plant is done on a property that belongs to another person or in an area where it may present a hazard to children, minimum jail time is nine months. Worse, the bill seeks to increase the maximum penalty for this particular offence to 14 years. See also: www.whyprohibition.ca



Google



Last Modified: